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Marrow Bones: English Folk Songs from the Hammond and Gardiner Manuscripts


The Shoemaker's Kiss: supplementary material

The Shoemaker

Shoemaker, shoemaker, are ye within?
A fal a falladdie falee;
Have ye got shoes that will fit me so trim,
For a kiss in the morning early?

O fair may come in and see,
A fal, &c.
I've got but ae pair, and I'll gie them to thee
For a kiss in the morning early.

He's tane her in behind the bench,
A fal, &c.
And there he has fitted his own pretty wench
With a kiss in the morning early.

Whan twenty weeks war come and gane,
A fal, &c.
This maid cam back to her shoemaker then,
For a kiss in the morning early.

O, says she, I can't spin at a wheel,
A fal, &c.
If ye can't spin at a wheel, ye may spin at a rock,
For I go not to slight my ain pretty work
That was done in the morning early.

When twenty weeks war come and gone,
A fal, &c.
This maid she brought forth a braw young son,
For her kiss in the morning early.

O says her father, we'll cast it out,
A fal, &c.
It is but the shoemaker's dirty clout,
It was got in the morning early.

O says her mother, we'll keep it in.
A fal, &c.
It was born a prince, and it may be a king, *
It was got in the morning early.

Whan other maids gang to the ball,
A fal, &c.
She must sit and dandle her shoemaker's awl,
For her kiss in the morning early.

When other maids gang to their tea,
A fal, &c.
She must sit at hame and sing balillalee,
For her kiss in the morning early.

*   King Crispin I presume. —GRK.

[Crispin is the patron saint of shoemakers, and 'King' Crispin traditionally led parades of the Shoemakers' Guild.]

From George Ritchie Kinloch, The Ballad Book. Edinburgh: 1827, XV; 55-57.